Flightless travel means traveling overland and overseas without airplanes. These flightless travel guides help you explore the world in a sustainable way.

The CO2 emissions of airplanes are massive. If you wish to travel in a way that’s tolerable for our planet, you should choose sustainable modes of transport. Overland travel is rarely as cheap and fast as flying, but it can give you unique experiences you’d miss otherwise.

After all, sometimes the journey is more important than the destination.

I have split my flightless travel guides into two categories: freighter travel guides and flightless travel routes. However, before we delve further into the two categories, I’ll explain my personal travel principle.

Train travel in Romania

Half-Flightless Travel

See also: What is Half-Flightless Travel?

I prefer traveling overland on public transport and I avoid flights and cruises. However, I know there are times when flying is very difficult to avoid. To give myself some flexibility, I follow my own principle which I call half-flightless travel. In other words, I make sure that I cover over half of my travel distance without flying.

I committed to half-flightless travel during my 2-year trip around the world. During the journey, I traveled 110 000 kilometers in total and over 60 000 of those were overland and overseas. And whenever I fly, I compensate my CO2 emissions with Atmosfair, and I recommend others to do the same.

I’ll give you an example of half-flightless travel.

When I started my trip around the world, I first traveled from Finland to Istanbul on public transport. After that, I flew three times in the Middle East: first to Iran, then to United Arab Emirates and finally from UAE to Kerala, south India. Once I reached India, I traveled 4000 kilometers overland from Kerala to Nepal.

The total length of a Finland–Istanbul–Kerala–Nepal flight route would have been 10 000 kilometers. However, I was able to cut my flight distance by half because I traveled overland in Europe and India – and I had memorable experiences in over 10 along the way!

Crossing the Pacific

Freighter Travel Guides

During my trip around the world, I traveled from New Zealand to the United States as a passenger on a cargo ship. The journey took 16 days and was one of the higlights of my journey. As freighter is considered CO2 neutral (with some considerations), I recommend it as a unique way to travel sustainably.

Freighter travel costs around 100-150 per day, and the price includes both meals and accommodation. There are multiple cargo ship travel agencies that help you book your trip. I used Freighter Travel (NZ) and the owner Hamish was very helpful when I ran into absurd Visa issues in Tonga. Other freighter travel agencies with informative websited include Cargo Ship Voyages, Kapitän Zylmann and Voyages en Cargo.

Here are all the articles I’ve written about freighter travel. I’ve also included examples of freighter routes on my flightless travel guides further below.

Flightless routes from Europe to Africa

Flightless Travel Routes

Flightless travel requires more research than flying. There might be multiple routes to choose from and little information available online. To help others travel sustainably, I have written several overland travel guides for different routes.

I wrote multiple border crossing guides for specific regions during my trip around the world. There might be very little information available about certain borders, and I’ve wanted to help others who wish to follow the same routes as I did. These guides are based on my personal experiences as well as online research.

After returning to Finland, I’ve written flightless travel guides that explore possible overland routes to different destinations. The first guides in the series describe ways to get from Europe to different continents without flying.

If you’re looking for more information about flightless travel, you can post your questions in the comments below!